Blog Posts

Do you have an old 401(k) sitting around from a previous job? If so, you have a few options to consider. You could cash out your account, but if you don’t put the cash back into an Individual Retirement Account (IRA) or other qualified account within 60 days, you’ll owe income taxes (and possibly penalties) on your withdrawal. If your current employer permits rollovers into its retirement plan, you may also be able to move your savings over to a new 401(k) and consolidate your investments.

Read more: ...

By: Michael J. Searcy

Using money you've worked hard to earn on your business makes sense. While other people are spending money on new cars or vacations, you hardly miss the funds you spend on your business because the prize at the end of the spending tunnel is in sight. You can see how the funds are helping to reach your goal of building a successful business.

Treating your retirement fund like another business is a strategy that can help set you up for future success. Payments you make today toward your retirement are funds that can be saved and invested to experience the benefit in the future. Think about why you own your business... Chances are you find joy in watching your business grow, and you expect it to provide a future payoff or benefit after years of dedication and hard work.

Read more: ...

By Michael J. Searcy

Every journey you take on an airplane comes with about a 0.0001 percent chance that you won't arrive at your final destination. With such a small percentage for failure, it's no surprise people feel secure flying all over the world, every day. Now what if you boarded a plane and the flight attendant came over the speaker saying, "The Federal Aviation Administration has requested we inform you there is now an 85 percent chance of flight failure"? I'm picturing people scrambling for their luggage and pushing their way through the aisles and off the plane.

Read more: ...

By: Michael J. Searcy

Picturing a snapshot of life in retirement might bring to mind images of gardening, grandchildren, relaxing on a beach and golfing – the images of activities people enjoy. The attraction of retirement is having the time to do what you enjoy, time for your hobbies. However, for many doctors, their job is their hobby. They love what they do, the skills they use, the people they meet, and the feeling of accomplishment. Retiring for them means the loss of a hobby, not a chance to gain new ones. Retirement means losing the opportunity to do something they love. If you love what you do, is work really work? Is there a way to retire in your job, not from your job?

Read more: ...
Page 3 of 3
video

The 5 Fundamentals of
Selecting the Right Advisor

Download Paper  right-arrow

Newsletter Signup

getting-started

GETTING STARTED WITH SEARCY