Blog Posts

As they get older, Americans face complicated decisions about long-term care, estate strategies, and their finances, while potentially struggling with diminished capacity to manage their affairs. At some point, your parents and other loved ones may need your help handling their finances. One study found that between five and ten percent of Americans over 65 need help with financial matters and another reported that 68 percent of elders suffer cognitive impairment or experience difficulty with daily tasks.

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By Jessica Maldonado

Do you have more patience for managing household finances than your spouse?

Do you make all of the financial decisions as the more financially savvy partner in the household?

Have you ever involved your children in a financial discussion?

 

Many of the important decisions we make regarding finances are made with family in mind, yet the duties for managing the finances are not always a family affair.  For a financial plan to truly support an entire family’s dreams and goals, getting buy-in and tackling decisions as a family unit is essential.  Here are some tips for developing a financially savvy family:

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By: Michael J. Searcy

Being prepared for the unexpected may not be high on your priority list. There are people who would have trouble locating their breaker box if the power went out, the fire extinguisher if cooking dinner took a wrong turn, or the car jack if they popped a tire. However, these situations produce immediate emergencies that could easily be overcome with a little preparation. The same goes for health or other issues that may affect the financial situation of your aging parents. These 5 questions can help you when approaching your parents about their financial well-being and discussing their wants and wishes.

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By: Jessica Maldonado

To send a child off into the "real world" without teaching him or her how to be smart about money is to set that child up for failure. So when is the right time to begin teaching your children about money? Put a one-dollar bill in your left hand and a $100 bill in your right hand. Then ask your child which one he or she wants. Children who are knowledgeable enough to know that the $100 bill is the one to go for are ready to start learning about money.

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